English Language Curriculum

Click on the links below to jump to a particular Year Group:

 

 

Year 9

Autumn Term
Students will undertake the study of John Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men. During this module, students will become familiar with the characters and ideas found in the novel, and examine the ways in which Steinbeck uses language to create this memorable and thought provoking work. Assessments will focus on language (a written, empathic response to a character situation) and literary ideas (an extract-based character study). Both assessments were rooted in the new linear GCSE frameworks.

Following this, students will study a selection of non-fiction texts on the themes of travel and science/discovery. Writing in a range of forms will springboard from these texts and be transactional in nature. Comparative assessment will look at understanding the language of different writers on the same topic.

Spring Term
Students will conclude the non-fiction topic, and then begin to study 19th-century fiction with an emphasis on Sherlock Holmes. Summative assessments will consist of creative writing of an opening to a detective story and a literary examination of the ways in which Arthur Conan Doyle makes his stories interesting.

Summer Term
Students will study a range of poetry on the theme of journeys, which progresses from the earlier non-fiction texts on this theme. A selection of texts will interpret journeys in a broad sense, both literal and metaphorical. The selection will be taken from different eras, in order to consider how travel/journeys have meant different things to people at different times. A language assessment will be to write a poem about a journey and provide an accompanying commentary.

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Year 10

Autumn Term
Students will follow a ‘Grammar for Writing’ unit, enabling them to organise information and ideas, using structural and grammatical features to support the coherence and cohesion of texts. By studying a range of journalistic texts, students will be able to analyse the language, form and structure used by a writer to create meanings and effects, using relevant subject terminology where appropriate.

Spring Term
Students will evaluate connections and develop their reading skills by comparing 20th and 21st century texts using a thematic approach. Students will be able to show understanding of the relationships between texts and the contexts in which they were written.

They will then move onto transactional writing tasks, where they will develop their ability to use of a range of vocabulary and sentence structures for clarity, purpose and effect.

Summer Term
Students will undertake a range of speaking and listening tasks to enable them to: demonstrate presentation skills in a formal setting; listen and respond appropriately to spoken language, including to questions and feedback to presentations; use spoken Standard English effectively in speeches and presentations.

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Year 11 (English Language iGCSE course only)

Autumn Term
Students will build on their reading and writing skills by studying a range of international texts to enable them to sequence facts, ideas and opinions; use a range of appropriate vocabulary; use register appropriate to audience and context; make accurate use of spelling, punctuation and grammar.

Students will also develop their speaking and listening skills in preparation for a presentation on a topic of their choice. They will learn how to: articulate experience and express what is thought, felt and imagined; present facts, ideas and opinions in a sustained, cohesive order; communicate clearly, fluently and purposefully as an individual and in dialogue with other speakers; use register appropriate to audience and context; listen to and respond appropriately to the contributions of others.

Spring Term
Students will study a range of poetry in preparation for an English literature assessment. They will develop their ability to read for meaning and select appropriate quotations.

Students will also revisit Of Mice and Men and increase their ability to demonstrate understanding of how writers achieve specific effects.

Summer Term
Finally, students will prepare for their forthcoming examinations and May and June (two in total) by revisiting their core exam text: A View from the Bridge, poetry, and Of Mice and Men and responding to an array of international texts.

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Year 12 (exam board: OCR)

Autumn Term
Students develop and hone core skills regarding the linguistic analysis of English Language, learning to differentiate between written and spoken analysis. Content includes learning the key constituents of English such as labelling terms, to more complex sentence and clause analysis. Students will learn how to create data using transcripts, and how to analyse spoken transcripts – both real and represented speech. Students will also examine the impact technology has had upon language.

Key Dates:
• w/c 5 October: Idiolect investigation, and analysis of a literary extract
• w/c 30 November: Language and technology analysis and a discursive response

Spring Term
Students begin to examine key topics more specifically in the spring term. Language and power is investigated, looking at speeches, advertising and the art of persuasion, as well as how occupation and socioeconomic status can affect perceptions of power. Students will also look at language and gender examining stereotyping and power issues. This term also sees the introduction of concepts underpinning Year 13 study, such as the history of language and children’s acquisition of language. In this term, students will also hone their exam skills in preparation for a mock exam

Key Dates:
• w/c 22 February: mock examination
• w/c 23 May: discursive response to CLA theory, and investigation into 20th-century texts

Summer Term
This term sees the launch of the independent study component. Students begin working on their language investigations, discussing apt titles, collecting and analysing data and compiling the report. Students also work on creating an academic poster and a presentation about findings. Parallel to this work is a series of genre analyses and discussions, especially looking at media texts, honing those data analysis skills

Key Dates:
• w/c 27 June: abstract and titles for coursework

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Year 13 (exam board: AQA – please note Year 12 and Year 13 follow different exam boards)

Autumn Term
Students will build on knowledge gained in AS; this year will be a synoptic year, together with the study of new concepts and issues.

The term opens with the language investigation; students will have an abstract and a suitable title for coursework folder, and this term prepares students in analysis data and forming apt conclusions.
Students begin studying the theories and concepts central to A2 study of English language: Child language acquisition and the history of English/language change. Students will look at contemporary texts before examining Middle and Old English.

Students will continue with the English Renaissance and the importance of religious texts and Shakespeare.

Key Dates:
• w/c 12 October: discursive essay about CLA theorists, and an investigation into Middle English and COURSEWORK FIRST DRAFT

Spring Term
Students will begin the Spring term with a synoptic test looking at a transcript analysis of children’s talk, and a comparison of different bibles. This term covers children’s written language acquisition and how children learn to read and write, including national strategies. Students continue their study of the history of language looking at the rise of Standard English and prescriptivism, and move on to the industrial revolution and Victorianism.

Key Dates:
• w/c 11 January: COURSEWORK FINAL DRAFT
• w/c 7 March: mock exam

Summer Term
The study of the history of English language comes full circle in the summer term as students revisit the 20th century, and its major concepts. Crucial to this term is preparation for terminal exam, and students will revisit concepts and issues first studied in Year 12.

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