English Literature Curriculum

Click on the links below to jump to a particular Year Group:

 

 

Year 9

Autumn Term
Students will undertake the study of John Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men. During this module, students will become familiar with the characters and ideas found in the novel, and examine the ways in which Steinbeck uses language to create this memorable and thought provoking work. Assessments will focus on language (a written, empathic response to a character situation) and literary ideas (an extract-based character study). Both assessments were rooted in the new linear GCSE frameworks.

Following this, students will study a selection of non-fiction texts on the themes of travel and science/discovery. Writing in a range of forms will springboard from these texts and be transactional in nature. Comparative assessment will look at understanding the language of different writers on the same topic.

Spring Term
Students will conclude the non-fiction topic, and then begin to study 19th-century fiction with an emphasis on Sherlock Holmes. Summative assessments will consist of creative writing of an opening to a detective story and a literary examination of the ways in which Arthur Conan Doyle makes his stories interesting.

Summer Term
Students will study a range of poetry on the theme of journeys, which progresses from the earlier non-fiction texts on this theme. A selection of texts will interpret journeys in a broad sense, both literal and metaphorical. The selection will be taken from different eras, in order to consider how travel/journeys have meant different things to people at different times. The literature assessment will be a mini-essay comparison response to an unseen poem alongside one studied during the course of the module.

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Year 10

GCSE English Literature - exam board Edexcel

Autumn Term
Students will study eight poems from the relationships cluster and develop skills to: analyse language, form, structure; maintain a critical style and informed personal response; make effective comparisons across the set poems.

Students will study 'A Christmas Carol' by Charles Dickens for a closed book examination. Students will develop close language analysis skills and be able to use textual references, including quotations, to support and illustrate interpretations of the novel.

Spring Term
Students will study the remaining seven poems from the relationships cluster and focus on comparison skills. Students will study a range of modern poetry and develop their ability to analyse the language, form and structure used by a writer to create meanings and effects, using relevant subject terminology where appropriate.

Summer Term
Students will study Macbeth in depth, enabling them to: appreciate the depth and power of the English literary heritage; write accurately, effectively and analytically about their reading, use Standard English; acquire and use a wide vocabulary, including grammatical terminology, and other literary and linguistic terms they need to criticise and analyse what they read.

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Year 11

GCSE English Literature - exam board Edexcel

Autumn Term
Students will then study Animal Farm by George Orwell. Students will be able to show an understanding of the relationships between texts and the contexts in which they were written. They will also learn how to use a range of contextual vocabulary and sentence structures for clarity, purpose and effect, with accurate spelling and punctuation.

Spring Term
Students will then start a revision programme on the set texts as well as studying modern poetry for an unseen comparison of two poems in the final literature examination.

Summer Term
The revision programme for the set texts above will continue during this term. A more comprehensive plan will be available for students before Easter.

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Year 12 (exam board: AQA Specification A)

Autumn Term

Love Through the Ages

Students will be studying towards an examined unit of work exploring depictions of love through the ages. They will be encouraged to read widely and independently around this topic, and look at contextual and historical details, critical interpretation and close analysis. Students will need to develop and practise close reading skills across the three texts they will be studying, including two unseen poems. Students will also be expected to identify and critically analyse how attitudes and values are communicated throughout the studied texts. Texts in the first term will include Othello by Shakespeare, and Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte. Wider knowledge of other Shakespeare plays and their reception, and well as knowledge of Romanticism and the portrayal of gender and power throughout literary history will be required for the examination. Students will also be required to make connections with the unseen poetry.

Assessment: w/c 30th Oct: Othello extract analysis

Spring Term

Love through the ages continued

Non-exam assessment: Texts across Time

Students will continue studying ‘‘Wuthering Heights’ by Emily Bronte; ‘Othello’ by William Shakespeare; an anthology of pre-1900 love poetry. They will also look at a range of poetry and develop their analytical skills when approaching unseen texts.
The aim if the internally assessed component is to encourage individual study, interest and enjoyment of modern literature and for students to develop:
• an appreciation of how writers shape meanings in texts through use of language, imagery, form and structure;
• an understanding of texts informed by an appreciation of different interpretations;
• an ability to explore connections across texts, such as stylistic, thematic or contextual.
Specific ideas for internally assessed coursework will be confirmed thorough individual tutorials and it will be our intention that no two pieces of coursework be the same. One text must be pre 1900, and should be 2500 words and a bibliography.

Assessment w/c 15th Jan ‘Wuthering Heights’ and poetry comparison

Summer Term

Texts in Shared Context

As with the autumn term, this will be an examined component, and students will study three texts – one prose, one poetry text and one drama. One of these texts must be post-2000, and therefore a recent text.
Students will take a ‘new historicist’ approach to exploring this period through literature, examining both contextual detail and literary texts. As with the autumn and spring term, students must gain confidence with close reading skills looking at narrative voice, characterisation and narrative structure. In addition, students must bring in ideas of drama and staging appropriate to the study of a play, and similarly to the first term, students must explore attitudes and viewpoints surrounding this difficult subject matter.
Texts in shared context will be taught alongside independent study, as will unseen poetry.

 

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Year 13

Autumn Term
This term will students will be working on their coursework unit Text in Time (unit F664).They will be working on how to address the assessment objectives in their work which involves comparing their three texts: Tess of the D’Urbervilles by Hardy, Great Expectations by Dickens, and the selected poems of Lord Tennyson.

Assessment dates:
12/10/15 – an abstract for the coursework and a short comparative piece
16/11/15 – first draft of coursework due
14/12/15 – final draft of coursework due

Spring Term
Students will be working on their exam texts for the final unit (F663). The texts for this are: The Tempest by Shakespeare, The Wife of Bath by Chaucer, and Tis A Pity She’s a Whore by Ford. The last two texts have to be compared in the final examination, while the Shakespeare text is examined separately.

Mock exam week is w/c 07/03/16.

Summer Term
The examination texts will be revised. A more detailed programme for revision will be available just before Easter.

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